FMT Certifications with CCE are nationwide!

FMT Certifications with CCE are nationwide!

Cross Country Education is leading the way in continuing professional development for healthcare professionals. We have developed a reputation in the healthcare community for quality and consistency for which we are very proud. We are excited about our partnership with RockTape and the unique advantages this provides for both customers and companies. We offer weekday seminars – a great opportunity for those looking to obtain RockTape certification who can’t make weekend courses. We produce over 5,000 seminars and conferences annually for the healthcare industry and we are happy to bring RockTape’s Functional Movement Techniques Certification Series to our expansive network of healthcare professionals. To sign up for a CCE RockTape course near you, click here. To learn more about Cross Country Education, click...
Mobility: When is Enough Enough?

Mobility: When is Enough Enough?

Mobility is a big trend right now in fitness, and for good reason. If you can’t move, you can’t train very well, either. You could spend the rest of your life reading all the books and articles and watching all the videos online about mobility. But when is enough really enough? Is the guy in the “Enter the Pain Cave” t-shirt who spends 45 minutes before and after every workout screaming as he tortures himself with his foam roller doing it right? Is that what you should be doing, too? Let’s try to demystify some of this stuff! To quote Alex Steffen, “More is not better. Better is better,” and that is particularly true of mobility work. It’s unlikely that foam rolling and other types of compression mobility really deform tissue much. Even though we use terms like “releasing tissue,” it’s more of a metaphor than what is really happening. Likewise, when we “stretch out,” there is probably very little real stretching actually happening. One study showed that it takes over 9000 Newtons of force (about 2040 pounds!) to deform our pal, the iliotibial band, by one percent. 1%! It takes about half as much force to change the plantar fascia on the bottom of your foot by the same amount, too. (1) That’s a crazy amount of force and there’s no way that’s happening with mobility techniques. Instead, what’s probably happening is that when you mobilize, you help these tissues slide and glide over one another. There’s also definitely a neurological effect. Mobilizing, rolling and applying pressure to the body with other implements will activate certain types of...
Your Shoulders Could Be Causing Your Low Back Pain

Your Shoulders Could Be Causing Your Low Back Pain

I had a patient once, let’s call him “Matt,” who came to see me, like so many do, for low back pain. He had recently started CrossFit training and his back pain onset coincided nicely with that. Matt had seen his family doctor who told him to stop doing CrossFit, but he wasn’t very happy with that advice. For as bad as that advice often is, it’s probably the #1 thing health care providers like to tell athletes, whether they are CrossFit training, lifting weights, running, or whatever. “Just stop doing that.” Great, thanks for the advice, doc, I never thought of that. Matt wasn’t satisfied and after some pressure, his doctor relented and sent him for a handful of physical therapy visits. These visits focused on the obvious problem, Matt’s lower back, and he did feel a little better, but most workouts bothered him still. The PT ended up agreeing with the Matt’s doctor, that “CrossFit is bad” and he should stop doing it. Matt took matters into his own hands and did a lot of mobility work, but still, no big differences. By the time I saw Matt, he was as frustrated as someone can be. Luckily for Matt, I know a thing or two about the demands of CrossFit and functional movement. I ran Matt through a couple of basic movement patterns and the problem couldn’t have been more obvious if it had hit me on the head. Matt’s low back wasn’t the problem… his shoulders were. No wonder all him homework on his lower back and all the treatments Matt had weren’t helpful. His lower...
Avoid CrossFit Burnout With 5 Easy Tips

Avoid CrossFit Burnout With 5 Easy Tips

Training burnout is a real thing, and it seems to especially affect CrossFit athletes. I’ve been through it myself and I’ve seen a lot of our gym’s athletes go through it, too. Sometimes people just get tired of things and want to switch it up, but here are my top 5 tips for avoiding the dreaded CrossFit burnout. Learn how to scale. Scaling your training isn’t just about substituting things you can’t do with things that you can do. Sure, that’s part of it, but it’s also about time and effort. Think of it this way… if a WOD is designed to take about 20 minutes, and you crush it in 10, you need to scale it up. If you spend 60 minutes on Fran, which is supposed to take less than four minutes, then you need to scale it down. Also scale so you can keep your activity relatively constant. If you have to keep stopping to huff and puff and not throw up, you need to scale it back some. Trying to Rx every WOD is a recipe for disaster, whether you’re a beginner and out of shape or seasoned and in your prime fitness. We have athletes at our gym who Rx every WOD, do a second WOD right after, and then go on a long run and they literally don’t break a sweat. Time to ramp up the intensity, ladies! CrossFit should never be easy. If it is, you need to scale up. You have to write stuff down to see results. A lot of people like the idea of coming into the CrossFit box,...
Living With Fibromyalgia the RockTape Way

Living With Fibromyalgia the RockTape Way

Fibromyalgia is a condition that is associated with generalized pain and stiffness as well as sleep problems and fatigue. Fibromyalgia is often accompanied by headaches or migraines, depression and/or anxiety, loss of ability to concentrate and even irritable bowel conditions. According to the latest data from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2005, fibromyalgia affects approximately five million Americans and it is seven times more commonly diagnosed in women than in men. Fibromyalgia is a difficult problem to deal with for both patients and healthcare providers because, like many ongoing pain disorders, it does not result from tissue damage like an acute injury, such as a sprained ankle, for example. There are also no specific diagnostic tests like imaging studies or blood tests for fibromyalgia. This often leads both patients and providers to the incorrect conclusion that fibromyalgia “isn’t real” and that the problem is “all in your head.” Medications are largely ineffective for fibromyalgia and can even make the symptoms worse in some cases. This often leads patients down the path of taking lots of supplements or doing other alternative treatments, which may or may not be very helpful. Fibromyalgia, like other ongoing or chronic pain disorders, is difficult to understand because on the surface, there is “nothing wrong.” In other words, there is no injury, tissue damage or stimulus that is causing the pain. So where is it coming from? There is a somewhat old-school misunderstanding of pain that it is an input into the brain. In reality, pain is an output. Pain is a protective mechanism that is created by processing information...

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